The Daily Thread

Pussy Hat Project Thoughts

Pussy Hat Project Thoughts

 

I would like to follow up after the march.  It was a beautiful site to see so many handmade hats at marches all over the world...lets keep up the cohesiveness and generosity.  Thank you to everyone who made a hat, picked up a hat and donated fiber.  You kept someone warmed, created community and worked with your hands & heart.  BRAVO 

From January 13th 

I would like to respond to the folks that dislike this project and explain more about my feelings and why I love it and think the idea of making is always a beautiful and powerful act. January 13th: I think the #pussyhatproject is a way for the creative community to connect to the march in DC and now also to the marches that are scheduled in other cities. A lot of people can’t afford to travel to DC but they can afford a ball of yarn or a yard of fleece and the time it takes to make a hat that will keep someone warm during the march. Every maker and crafter can relate to the feeling of making for another and the connection that it brings. That connection is rooted in good intentions—and this is the spirit that drives the pussy hat effort.
Personally, I see it as an incredible act of community, generosity, and protest on the part of the folks that are marching and of those that are making. The sea of pussy hats in Boston, DC, and other cities will send a message that women (and men) are taking a stand in favor of civil rights for everyone. What's more, the hats will deliver this message in a medium--fiber--that has historically been associated with women's work; with these hats, we are affirming that our "hand work" can have a political and social impact.
On another note, the word “pussy" is obviously slang for a person who is afraid, a cat, and a vagina. By making and marching under this label, we are collectively taking back ownership of this word and its demeaning connotations.
Finally, I want to address those who have criticized the pussy hat project on social media and elsewhere. This project is diverse and involves makers and marchers of all stripes. Instead of superficially writing it off, critics should seriously reflect on what is at stake in our country and what each one of us can do to contribute. No protest movement is perfect, and certainly people of good will can (and should) disagree. But I would guard against letting petty critiques distract and divide us. Let’s put our energy into building up, not tearing down.